About Me

My photo
Author | Blogger | Workshop Facilitator Visit my website at www.authordeelawrence.com to learn more about my romantic suspense novel, Gotta Let It Go, which is set in Baltimore. Connect with me online @authordeelawrence (Facebook). Thanks for visiting with me today!

Tuesday, January 30, 2018

A Review of The Root of all Evil by Joylynn M. Jossel


Meet Klarke Taylor, a mother of two and happily married until her husband blew up her world with his lies and infidelity. Now, she has a pile of bills and creditors breathing down her back. So she devises a plan along with her two besties, Jeva and Breezy to get her a man to bail her out of her financial situation. Reo Laroque is the man who fits the bill. He’s a bestselling author and is looking for a woman who can be his wife. However, all doesn’t go so smoothly as he is caught up in a twisted case of love, lust and lies.

This story had too much going on. Not only did Klarke have drama with her ex-husband, her boss and her new husband but her besties had issues with their men as well. While there were some interesting moments in this book, I felt the story would have been better served if it had fewer subplots. I perked up toward the end when Reo’s six-month-old daughter drowned in his pool and Klarke confessed to the crime but there was no hard evidence to put her away in jail. I was left wondering who did it and it was also unclear whether Harris played a part in it or not… then the book ended. Otherwise, it was an enjoyable read.

My favorite lines:

My beef has always been with you, Tionne. What’s strange is that I probably wouldn’t have even been mad at you if you were just the other woman. But when you decided to take on the role of my friend—laughing in my face, going out with me, coming over to my house and having me baby-sit your and Harris’s love child, you crossed the line. Otherwise my only beef would have been with Harris. Harris took vows and made a commitment to me, not you. You didn’t owe me shit. Harris did. I’m not like most women who fly off the handle and set out to beat the mistress down. But you, Tionne, you pretended to be my friend. You played me and that hurt.

Rating: 3 Stars



Sunday, January 28, 2018

Do the Opposite and Win as a Writer! (Part 2)

Welcome to Part 2 of my review of Dawn Field’s “How to Fail as a Writer” blog and why you should do the opposite to WIN as a writer.

1.  Be as original as possible, forget conforming to any genre expectations.
My opposite: As writers our work tend to fit into various categories or genres. You are either a fiction writer or non-fiction writer and sometimes even both. Nevertheless, there are rules or expectations from the publishing industry and from your readers as well. I write romantic suspense novels and so you would expect to see elements of danger and romance not a comedic novel. The blue print is out there for whatever genre you decide to write and it’s best to follow them if you want to be a successful writer.

2. Ignore the belief that publishable books have structure or that you need one.
My opposite: Structure or plotline is what holds a book together. Without structure, your book will invariably fall apart. This can lead to reader complaints and that’s not a good thing. So take the time to develop a plotline and then review it to make sure it tracks the story you are trying to tell.

3. Leave details as ambiguous as you can. Let your readers rely on their mind-reading abilities to intuit what you really meant.
My opposite: What’s a story without details? Well, it’s a story that won’t capture and keep the readers attention from start to finish. So, please ensure that your story is filled with clear details that will help the readers envision exactly what you mean.

4. Make sure your readers cannot easily form mental images from your story.
My opposite: The whole point of writing is to capture the readers imagination and draw them into a world you have created on paper. If readers can’t connect with the characters by knowing what they look like or places that they go then this makes for a bad story. Bottom line, writers need to engage the readers five senses: sight, sound, smell, taste and touch to pull them into the story.

5. Don’t worry about logical inconsistencies, keep your readers on their toes!
My opposite: Readers love a good story. However, what they don’t like (I’m wearing my reader hat here) are inconsistencies in the storylines. If they have to flip back to pages where you described something one way from the page they are on, they will get frustrated and put the book down.

6. Do not waste time learning the craft of writing. Focus on producing lots of words – that’s what writing is all about.
My opposite: Writing is more than producing lots of words especially if there is no cohesiveness to it (e.g. shoddy plot structure, stilted dialogue, no character motivation, etc.). So, my advice would be take a few writing courses, attend writing workshops and conferences to learn and hone the craft of writing. I have done all of this and continue to do so because there’s always something new to learn.

7. Don’t read, not even the great authors. And especially never read other authors in your genre. Their writing might rub off on you and make yours less original.
My opposite: I cringe whenever I hear writers say they don’t read the writings of other authors especially if they are in their genre. They are definitely doing themselves a major disservice if they don’t. For me, I enjoy reading suspense, thriller and detective novels with a hint of romance. So my library is filled with books from Eric Jerome Dickey, Carl Weber, John Grisham, Walter Mosley, etc. I read them to get a feel of the plotline, character’s motivation, the setting and the dialogue. This propels me to sharpen my craft and in no way makes my writing less original. In addition, I would recommend that writers not limit themselves to reading in their genre as they can gain a better appreciation for the written word from various genres.

8. Do not research your topic. Your intuition is more compelling than facts.
My opposite: Not doing your research is a big No No. In order to make your writing resonate with readers and allow them to connect with your characters and the storyline you need to do your research. So, if your novel involves a murder, you need to research police procedures, medical terminology, etc. In other words, you need to write a story that is grounded in reality and that makes your characters and the plotlines believable.  

Monday, January 22, 2018

Interview with Larry Matthews, author of Nine Millimeter Solution

Author’s Bio: Larry Matthews is a veteran of thirty-five years in broadcast journalism, working in radio and television in major markets and networks. He has published eleven books, eight of them fiction. He was a street reporter, investigative reporter, anchor, news director, editor and producer. His Dave Haggard thrillers have been top-ten sellers on Amazon.

What’s the inspiration for writing your book?
LM: This is the 4th Dave Haggard thriller. Each deals with a theme or crime. The first was about a psychopathic priest, the second about greed and corruption, the third about terrorism, and now the 4th is about human trafficking. All of the Haggard books are Washington thrillers. Dave is a D.C.-based reporter, as was I, so I use my own experience as a platform for the stories. Nine Millimeter Solution is also about the cynicism that has overtaken our political world. Many people don’t know who the good guys are, so I try to use that confusion in the book. But there are clearly some very bad people at the heart of this story.

Is there any particular author or book that influenced you in any way either growing up or as an adult?
LM: Yes, but it had nothing to do with thriller writing. When I was a young man I read and was changed by Narcissus and Goldmund by the great German author Herman Hesse. It is a story set long ago about two men, one a scholar and the other a man of the earth who meet in a cloistered monastery. One, Narcissus, remains and lives a life of faith and scholarship. The other, Goldmund, goes out to experience the world and suffers for it, but he also enjoys all of the pleasures of life. To me the book is about the choices we all face when we are young.

How long did it take to write your book?
LM: This one took several years. I got about twenty-thousand words into it and lost the thread, so I wrote another book and then found my way back to Nine Millimeter Solution.

Do you write with an outline, or just let it flow organically?
LM: Ah, the “pantser versus plotter” question. I’m 80 per cent pantser, meaning I tend to write by the seat of my pants. I do like to know where I’m going so I write the last scene first and then mull over how I will get there.

Do you listen to music when you write? If yes, is there a theme song for this book?
LM: I sometimes listen to music, especially if it will fit the scene I’m writing. Dave Haggard is from east Tennessee, the mountain area, so I will listen to what is sometimes called Hillbilly Music. I can use the word Hillbilly because it’s my heritage, even though my cousins don’t like it.

What are the keys to success in marketing your book(s)?
LM: Oh boy! If anyone has a workable answer please let me know. Most writers I know scramble to find readers. Many, I’m sad to say, write truly great books that never find wide readership. Outlets like this blog are very helpful in calling attention to works that might not find access to mass audiences.

I am very excited about a forthcoming audiobook of Nine Millimeter Solution to be narrated by Dave Lawrence, a Hollywood actor and in-demand book narrator and voice artist. He’s done over 150 audiobooks, some best sellers. He’s also a longtime friend. Look for it in March.

What advice would you give to aspiring writers?
LM: The keyboard is your friend. Spend a lot of time with it.

How about sharing an excerpt from Nine Millimeter Solution?

“The boat was open and the rain soaked the passengers who bobbed in the Gulf of Mexico, some of them retching over the side. The man in charge, a scarred, hard Mexican, smacked a teenage girl who was crying and hysterical. “Shut up,” he said. “I will leave you to the sharks.” His English was rough and he spoke in the cadence of his native Spanish. “We will be there soon and you will be somebody else’s problem.” The man was a coyote, a mover of human beings. On this night he was delivering a dozen teenage girls to a trader in Texas who bought and sold women and girls to eager markets in the United States.”

What’s next for you?
LM: It’s hard to say. This is my 11th published book, so my idea bag is getting low. I’m working on a new book about two very amoral people, a man and a woman, who keep up appearances as community and church leaders but whose personal lives are awful. It’s a fun project but I don’t know if I will publish it. My early readers break two ways: men love it and want more, women hate it and one even urged me to stop writing it. So…

Where can readers find out more about you and your book(s)?
It’s been a pleasure having you here with us today. I know my readers will enjoy getting to know you and your work.





Sunday, January 21, 2018

Do the Opposite and Win as a Writer! (Part 1)

I recently read a blog by Dawn Field titled "How to Fail as a Writer" and she listed 23 ways to do just that. While I'm sure there are more ways to fail, I wanted to talk about the first eight in Part I of my blog review of her list and why you should do the opposite to WIN as a writer.

Here goes:

1. Don’t worry too much about your opening line. Readers will soon be past it and into the good stuff.
My opposite: Please, please, please do worry about the opening line. Why? Because the first line of the first chapter determines whether readers will want to read the next paragraph or the next chapter of your novel. Once you get readers hooked they will want to read more of your work!

2. Don’t be concerned that your ending goes off with a fizzle. The rest of the book was worth the price of admission.
My opposite: Endings are a pain. I struggle with this too because if you have a story that sizzles and pops you don't want to be stuck wondering how to wrap things up. So I would suggest spending some time to write an ending that leaves readers gratified.

3. Don’t worry about typos and grammatical errors. Trivial details won’t bother veteran readers.
My opposite: Nothing turns readers off more than reading a novel with typos and grammatical errors. It's a sign that you don't care about yourself as a writer to polish your work and that readers don't matter. And please hire an editor and even when you do, please do your due diligence and read through your work again as there may be a few missed typos and grammatical errors.

4. Go with your first complete draft as your final draft. Your gut instincts were correct the first time around, you’ll just dilute them when you edit.
My opposite: A resounding NO. The first drafts are usually rushed to get the story completed. Once that's done then the real work begins to polish, polish, polish, or rewrite, rewrite, rewrite. I know rewriting may sometimes change the plotline but it's worth rewriting it to get the best product you can produce.

5. Only write when the urge hits you. If you need discipline to write, it’s not really writing.
My opposite: You should have a writing regime or else you fall into a place of no return. Trust me, I have been there and it's not a nice place to lift yourself out of. But, I'm trying to maintain a more balanced writing schedule.

6. Do not exercise, enjoy hobbies, or have any kind of life . Any minute spent not writing is time down the drain.
My opposite: Please exercise, enjoy hobbies, engage with friends and simply take care of yourself. I know if I didn't, I would be no good as a writer as these activities help feed my creative soul.

7. Sleep as little as possible. Sleep deprivation will unlock your inner writing god.
My opposite: Nothing rejuvenates me more than a good night's sleep. Listen to your body and get the necessary sleep as it's the best thing to replenish your mental acuity and to release your inner writing god.

8. Quit your day job immediately. Work gets in the way of your writing.
My opposite: Now this is laughable. Unless, you have a coffer of cash lying around, I would strongly suggest that you keep your day job. I know that work can sometimes get in the way but you have to carve out some time for your creative adventures. I do!

Thanks for reading. Stay tuned for Part 2 next week!






Sunday, January 14, 2018

Tips and Tricks for Writing Popular Fiction Novels

So you have a great idea for a fiction novel. Now, where do you start?

As for me, I started out by taking a few creative writing classes and throughout the years I continued to hone my skills through various workshops and attending writers conferences. I have also spent so reading a wide variety of books some within my genre (romantic suspense) and others outside my genre (non-fiction, etc.).

Anyway, I recently read the following John Grisham's suggestions for writing popular fiction and wanted to share them with aspiring writers. Also, this is a great reminder for me to see how I measured up against these suggestions.

1. Do write a page every day - Failed, but I'm working on that.

2. Don't write the first scene until you know the last - Semi-failed. I have a tendency to write and figure things out as I go along. But, I'm working on at least having a road map of where I want my stories to go.

3. Do write your one page at the same place and time - When I do write it's usually at the same place, but at different times.

4. Don't write a prologue - Passed with flying colors as I typically like to dive into writing my story. Also, I think prologues can be somewhat distracting.

5. Do use quotation marks with dialogue - Passed with flying colors as this is basic.

6. Don't keep a thesaurus within reaching distance - Sigh, it's right behind me on my book shelve, but I rarely use it. If necessary, I tend to jump online to http://www.dictionary.com

7. Do read each sentence at least 3 times in search of words to cut - Aaah, the proverbial killing your darlings. Over the years, I have done a better job of getting rid of words that slow down the pacing of my stories.

8. Don't introduce 20 characters in the first chapter - Passed with flying colors because as a writer I run the risk of not only confusing my readers but myself. So, I tend to limit the first chapter to no more than 2 or 3 of the main characters.



Sunday, January 7, 2018

Reflections of Things Past

Whew, now that the hustle and bustle of the holiday season are over, I'm now able to catch my breath and reflect back on 2017. For starters, 2017 was a year that pushed me artistically, personally and professionally.

Anyway, here are a few things I was definitely proud of myself for doing:

  • Hiring a publicist to revamp my website as it's been neglected for far too long and I love the new look! 
  • Freshening up the cover of my first novel, Gotta Let It Go, relaunching the second edition and making it available online at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, etc. 
  • Hiring an editor for the sequel, Gotta Get It Back - and yes this has been sitting for a few years. I'm shaking my head here because I'm guilty of not making this a priority amidst the craziness of life. But onward I go.
  • Changing my look (new hairstyle) which came with a new level of sassiness.
  • Diving into a new attitude about living, loving, and laughing out loud.
  • Embracing when folks do their own thing and being there to support them when needed without hesitation. 
  • Striking a balance between work and play and knowing I can't win them all.

Nevertheless, there were a few things that remained constant: 

  • Meeting with my monthly writers' group and enjoying the company of my fellow writers. We even incorporated having an icebreaker before our meetings. With only a few minutes to discuss a single question, we got to learn more about each other.
  • Loving and taking care of ME: gym time, spa time, alone time, and chill time with family and friends.
  • Reading and enjoying written words from some of my favorite authors and some new ones too.
  • Enjoying the arts - love, love, love the new productions of Baltimore Center Stage and yes I will truly miss Kwame Kwei-Armah. He did an excellent job!
  • Connecting with my readers via my monthly newsletter.
  • Networking with my fellow creatives online and in person. 
  • Being thankful for all the blessings bestowed upon me.
Toward the end of the year, I was given a blow by the loss of a good friend. This created yet another pause as to how I wanted to live my life in 2018. Moving forward, I promise to write more because he would have wanted me to, live my best life with no regrets, love unconditionally, embark on new horizons, and be happy above all else!

So, 2018 here I come!! #fearless #fierce #boundlessjourney







Monday, January 1, 2018

Interview with Daneace Jeffery, Author of Another Me

Author’s Bio: Daneace Terry Jeffery is a Baltimore-based children’s book author and a teacher who has taught for 19 years in Howard County, MD. Ms. Jeffery earned a B.A. in English and a M.S. in Literacy. She has five grandchildren who are all bi-racial. Another Me is the third book in the Ella series that is loosely based on the life of her eldest granddaughter.

What inspired you to write your book?
DJ: I was inspired to write the first book after the birth of my first bi-racial granddaughter. It was important to me to find books to add to her library that featured a bi-racial child. Unable to find the right book, I decided to publish my own. I was not looking for the “look I’m a bi-racial child” book, but just a regular picture book with the main character being bi-racial. 

Is there any particular author or book that influenced you in any way either growing up or as an adult?
DJ: Being a children’s book author was something totally out of my arena.  Growing up my influence surrounded authors like Nikki Giovanni, Richard Wright, Gwendolyn Brooks, Langston Hughes and believe it or not, Shakespeare and Chaucer.

Is this your first book? How long did it take to start and finish your book?
DJ: No, Ella and Her Bubbles was the first book and Grandma’s Two is the second book. Another Me is my third book.  It took about 3 months to write this third book, because I would write a few lines and put it away.

Do you write with an outline, or just let it flow organically?
DJ: Because these are picture books, I don’t use an outline, I take my inspiration from my grandchildren and their lives.

Do you listen to music when you write? If yes, is there a theme song for this book?
DJ: No, I don’t listen to music at all when I write, I need the peace and quiet to hear my thoughts.  My ideal surrounding to write is somewhere near water like a deserted beach or ocean. I love nature’s music.

What are the keys to success in getting your book out to the public?
DJ: My key to success is feet to the floor.  You have to be willing to put in the hard work of selling yourself in whatever manner you can.  I try to place myself in situations where I can be seen and heard with book in hand of course. And a good publicist is also another option.

What advice would you give to new authors?
DJ: The best advice I would give to new authors is to do your homework, know your weakness and be prepared for hard work that may not lead to success the first time around. Anyone can write a book, but will anyone buy that book?  If the market is already saturated with books about peanuts, you better have a new idea of what to do with those peanuts before you spend money to publish.

How about sharing an excerpt from Another Me?  
DJ: The baby is here and her name is Sophia. Today I am going to meet my baby sister at the hospital for the first time. I am very happy that I can play with her now and tell her all about the fun things we can do when she comes home. I hope she likes all of the stuffed animals and toys I left in her crib. When I get to the hospital and walk in the room Mommy is holding her. I just stop and stare. She is very small.

What’s next for you?
DJ: I plan on publishing books four and five in the Ella Book series, but first I am taking a detour to write a book based on the aftermath of the death of my nephew who was one of the sailors killed on the USS Fitzgerald this past June. This book will be about all of the various people and organizations that have held our family together in this time of national tragedy.

Where can readers find out more about you and your book(s)?
·         Website: www.ellabooks.weebly.com
·         Facebook: Ella and Her Bubbles
·         Twitter: @EllaBubbles

It’s been a pleasure having you here with us today. I know my readers will enjoy getting to know you and your work.